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Thread: Compare Exede DAP's with AT&T and others

  1. #1
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    Thumbs up Compare Exede DAP's with AT&T and others

    (As we analyze the new Exede DAP and pricing plans offered by ViaSat we see it is not as bad as some, when compared to cost vs allowed data caps).

    AT&T hikes rates

    NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- The mobile data our smartphones love to suck up is once again going up in price.

    AT&T on Wednesday hiked rates on its smartphone and tablet data plans. The new rates will go into effect on Sunday, but only new customers will be affected. Those under contract will keep their current rates. AT&T said that existing customers will never be required to switch to the new rates, even if they upgrade their phones.

    The wireless giant raised the cost of its lowest-tier data package to $20 per month, up from $15 -- a 33% price hike. AT&T (T, Fortune 500) offered a carrot alongside the stick: It increased the amount of data in that plan to 300 megabytes per month, up from 250 MB.

    In the low-tier plan, the extra 50 MB will give users access to about a half-hour more of streaming video, or 150 more posts to social media sites.

    AT&T's higher-tier plan was also hiked to $30 a month, up from $25 -- a 20% increase. Those users will now get 3 gigabytes of data per month. Under the old plan, they only got 2 GB of data.

    For tablets like Apple's (AAPL, Fortune 500) iPad, AT&T completely eliminated its low-tier plan of 250 MB of data for $15 per month. Starting on Sunday, customers can choose between a $30 a month plan for 3 GB or a $50 a month plan for 5 GB.

    AT&T said it will notify customers as they approach their data limits. It will charge a $20 overage fee for an extra 300 MB for the low-tier plans, and $10 per extra GB on the higher-tiered plans.

    AT&T said it raised rates as customers' data usage continues to grow by an astounding 40% per year.

    "Our new plans are driven by this increasing demand in a highly competitive environment," David Christopher, AT&T Mobility's chief marketing officer, said in a prepared statement.

    Christopher called AT&T's new plans a "great value." Compared to its chief rival, it certainly looks that way. Verizon only offers 2 GB for the same $30 a month and does not have a low-tier offering for smartphones.

    But it's clear that smartphone customers' data needs are exploding. That means that one way or another, most will eventually pay more for their monthly service.

    Last June, when AT&T first introduced tiered pricing and ended its unlimited data option, the company said that just 2% of its users were going over the 2 GB per month threshold.

    Is that still true? Probably not. AT&T declined to comment on what percentage of its customers are currently using more than 2 GB per month.

    As mobile data usage increases and carriers run out of spectrum to cram data into, they are raising rates and limiting usage on their networks.

    Verizon (VZ, Fortune 500) followed AT&T in July by ending its unlimited offering, and T-Mobile similarly cancelled its unlimited data plan in April. Sprint (S, Fortune 500) remains the lone national carrier that provides unlimited data for its customers.

    But all of them have raised prices, ended perks, or stiffened penalties within the last year. Sprint, for instance, raised its early termination fee in December. Verizon cancelled its New Every Two bonus discounts a year ago, and T-Mobile began throttling customers speeds when they exceeded their data limits.
    WB Legacy 2/12/09, 2/23/12 to Exede12-1 SB 342, Albuquerque Gateway, AcceleNet servers Denver, Dell Desktop XP-Home SP3, D-Link DIR655 Router, Dell Laptop Vista Home Basic SP2, Chrome browser .

  2. #2
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    I'm not sure I would agree that comparing a plan that is for mobile that I can take with me anywhere to a fixed satellite dish is a fair comparison. The comparison should be between other fixed end point plans such as DSL, cable, etc. in my opinion.
    Beam 21 | Pro Pack | Customer Since WB started and its been all downhill

  3. #3
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    Default More closely related to wireless.

    Quote Originally Posted by pman View Post
    I'm not sure I would agree that comparing a plan that is for mobile that I can take with me anywhere to a fixed satellite dish is a fair comparison. The comparison should be between other fixed end point plans such as DSL, cable, etc. in my opinion.
    Satellite internet is more closely related to ground-based wireless internet when you look at the infrastructure needed to support either.

    Satellite internet can not compete with DSL or Cable internet..at least until the sky is full of ViaSat type satellites...

    You have to break it down to "Cost-per-byte" to deliver from the internet backbone to a customers' computer..many reports have attempted to do this and without exception satellite delivery is far more expensive than DSL or Cable.
    WB Legacy 2/12/09, 2/23/12 to Exede12-1 SB 342, Albuquerque Gateway, AcceleNet servers Denver, Dell Desktop XP-Home SP3, D-Link DIR655 Router, Dell Laptop Vista Home Basic SP2, Chrome browser .

  4. #4

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    I also don't think it is fair to compare satellite Internet to other wireless plans. The wireless plans primarily provide secondary Internet access for people. Those of us on satellite use it for primary Internet access because we have no other option.

    I have a wireless plan already, but need satellite Internet too because I have no other "hardwire" Internet options at home and wireless Internet (except for Sprint) does not have enough data allowance for my daily Internet use (of course Wildblue's new plans are not much better at providing this).

  5. #5
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    Well, look at the two business models, wireless and satellite internet...neither service can compete with DSL or Cable for home internet use, and both are only after the home market that has no other choice beside dial-up..so it is fair to compare the two services for home internet use...many customers have switched from satellite internet to 3g or 4g wireless services as soon as a signal is within reach of their home...but are still faced with DAP limitations..

    The mobile market can't be compared to home internet use...but, the new ViaSat services are starting to make progress on competing for mobile internet use...right now they are starting to activate internet service for in-flight airline carriers...

    Satellite internet has just begun to compete with wireless for "Home" internet use...it still has a ways to go to be able to compete with DSL or Cable internet...no matter what hype we have read...there's not enough high-speed satellites in orbit to do this..but the future may change...more high speed satellites are planned...and one day it can, and will, compete with DSL and cable.
    WB Legacy 2/12/09, 2/23/12 to Exede12-1 SB 342, Albuquerque Gateway, AcceleNet servers Denver, Dell Desktop XP-Home SP3, D-Link DIR655 Router, Dell Laptop Vista Home Basic SP2, Chrome browser .

  6. #6

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    Sorry. I don't see satellite Internet ever competiting with DSL or cable. First, there are a number of technical reasons for this. Second, price.

    I know I certainly wouldnt give up my wireless Internet for satellite. But with low data caps on the wireless, I need satellite Internet because I have no other options. Now, if Wildblue thinks it can sell me on little a 7.5gb monthly cap for the price, that isn't going to happen. And to buy more data cap, it then prices itself out of the marketplace.

  7. #7

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    thats a good one bama and i really want to bite. but that dog don't hunt
    big diff between launching a sat and (ask the russians) then driving down a road and pluckin down a post with antennas.
    (Satellite internet has just begun to compete with wireless for "Home" internet use).
    How So? i have been using sat for i think 14 years my impression is not agood one.i can only speak for myself any one that can get wireless around here. does so and never looks back.
    It is not the technology it is the people who drive it. So far they have only driven into the ground.NAME CHANGE you have read all that crap. they laughed about cramming so many on signal.the money was killer. the liberty media guys cleaned up.viasat wants to pitch it for gov funds wildblue sat did not meet requirements tooooooo slooooooooowwwwww.
    thus the new speed.
    I am going with the pman on this

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Missouri
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    Wildblue should be compared with the uverse wireless plan as they are home broadband not wireless mobile broadband and the caps on the uverse plans are 10 times what wildblue has which is what I consider reasonable even the standard ATT wireless home broadband cap is 150 gig which I would also be happy with. I just downloaded a 2.5 meg movie on my iphone via 3g and the same movie on my computer with wildblue both were the same email and the iphone did it in half the time speed check on WB and it was as advertised so the 3g network around here has gotten much faster than it was a year ago.

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